Home Forums Sustainable Water Management (SWM01) SWM01 – Introduction to sustainable water management in a climate change context

Profile picture of

This topic contains 73 replies, has 32 voices, and was last updated by  Ramadhan Mohammed 3 years, 3 months ago.

  • Author
    Posts
  • #7534
    Profile picture of
    Damian Indij
    Keymaster

    We know there are a variety of water users which are interdependent.

    • When this happens in any situation in your country, are all stakeholders involved in planning, decision making, and management?
    • Why may this participatory and integrated approach be in practice or not?
    • What is the evidence of commitment to integrated water resources management in your country?
    • What type of “water knowledge” is needed to move into IWRM?
    • Who looses when water governance is not effective?

    Please don´t extend your comments more than 10 lines. The goal of this first forum is not to exhaust the topic, but to open a discussion. That´s why we recommend that you focus on the aspect which captures more your attention and don´t worry for answering all questions. Let´s share and build knowledge all together.

    You can leave your comments at the bottom of this page. Subscribe to the topic (top right corner) to stay informed on updates.

  • #7562
    Profile picture of
    Ramadhan Mohammed
    Participant

    In my country Iraq not all stakeholders are involved in planning, decision making, and management, each sectors have it own plan, and they submit their plan to ministry of planning and they try to have uniform plan, and this cause duplication of activities or controversy in project implementation and this kind of participatory is not as integrated approach in practice and the evidence of commitment to integrated water resources management in my country is are not very obvious in practice due to fragile political conditions.
    Since we have not “water knowledge” management strategy, so we face difficulties to involve the use of information technology to be able to share of water managing knowledge in the organizational activities to move into IWRM, the community loses when water governance is not effective.

    • #7578
      Profile picture of
      Damian Indij
      Keymaster

      Thanks very much for your comment. You are bringing up a very important issue and I may image the difficulties in Iraq given the situation you are going through. The challenge is that in a large extent it remains true that various sectors will always have their specific plans and interests, and integrated does not necessarily mean that all sectors will merge into one huge water sector, with one plan. So, the challenge is, how to move into an integrated strategy, without leaving a side the relevance and interest of each specific sector? Let´s see if along the course we can gain some ideas which help us respond to this question.

      • #7637
        Profile picture of
        Rosario Barranquero
        Participant

        In Argentina also occur overlapping legislative frameworks and institutions. In many cases this makes that each agency has not clarity about her functions and responsibilities and crashing into inaction. However the implementation of integral water management at the basin level is displayed in some initiatives. A clear example is the creation of the Matanza-Riachuelo Basin Authority (ACUMAR) which is a public organization which serves as the highest authority on environmental issues in the region; in the conceptual foundations of forming this entity it has been considered the participation of all stakeholders in the thematic and integrated approach of ecological, economic, social and cultural components.

      • #8047
        Profile picture of
        Alejandro Rossi
        Participant

        Hi Rosario, the Matanza Riachuelo River Basin Authority in Argentina is a very interesting case. Created in 2006 as a consequence of a decision issued by Supreme Court of Justice ruling, the Federal Congress “freely” decided to create a basin organism. The river basin organism (ACUMAR) concentrate several competencies which previously were distributed over more than 25 entities. However, 9 years after the Supreme Court ruling and with a strong river basin authority ongoing, river pollution remains a serious issue. Participation is a very important issue, but it is still needed to assure proper enforcement against private companies and public utilities, as well as to address budgetary and technical capacities strengthening.

  • #7563
    Profile picture of
    Ruth Katebe
    Participant

    In our country Zambia , the stakeholders are involved in the planning and the decision making , athough at in some areas people have little or no knowledge at all about they are participation in the planning and decision making in matters that concerns water, more especially in the rural areas. But am happy that some concerned members of the public have taken interest in making awareness in those areas.

    Participatory approach should be practiced because people need to know that they have a role in the planning and decision making inorder for the country to have more great ideas on how to improve and build our water sector.

    • #7579
      Profile picture of
      Damian Indij
      Keymaster

      Thanks for your comment and it´s positive to see the type of awareness taking place in terms of people´s roles and participation. Of course participation is one of the key principles for sustainable water management, or IWRM. However, I´d like to share with you two questions which we can explore together: i) what kind of knowledge and information is needed to make such participation effective? In other words, it is fair only to provide a room for participation without providing first basic knowledge and information; ii) Looking at it from another angle, what type of knowledge do these water users have which should be shared with others and considered for the best possible water management?

  • #7564
    Profile picture of
    Menahil Hannouna
    Participant

    Stakeholders engagement in the watwr sector in Iraq is relatively weak with the consideration that th Minstry of Water Resources is the dominating entity in taking water decisions related to the water resources. The coordination between the various relevant entities needs to be improved and decision making required to be taken in consensus. The country has developed a decree to establish a National Water Council under the Prime Minister observation which proof the country commitment to adapt the approach .There is enough knowledge about various water aspects and sientific subjects whereas the facilities & support for research and implementation of new projects are limited . Communities especialy in rural areas and also in many suburbs are impacted by water shortage and deterioration of the water supply infrastructure .The case is that a significant number of areas are served by water trucking as a need to improve the water and wastewater services is huge.

    • #7580
      Profile picture of
      Damian Indij
      Keymaster

      Thanks for your response and for such an illustrative description of the situation in the Iraq water sector. There seems to be a good political decision to making progress, which is always a condition and a good start. Your comment also makes us see the combination of problems needing urgent infrastructure development, with some others needing “soft” interventions to promote better coordination, and participation. In terms of capacity development, you mention something which is usually the case, capacities and skills are there, but further resources are needed to conduct a sustained capacity development process. This is one major challenge which we, capacity developers from Cap-Net and other partners, always advocate for. Let´s continue!

  • #7570
    Profile picture of
    Khema Pelapolwatte
    Participant

    In Sri Lanka all stakeholders are not involved in planning ,decision making and management of water use.In my opinion this is because proper practice of IWRM is not in action.The value of precious water and impending water scarcity in the near future ,equity and fairness in water distribution must be known to move in to IWRM.People,animals and environment looses when water governanace is not active.

    • #7581
      Profile picture of
      Damian Indij
      Keymaster

      Thanks for your contribution and for sharing the situation in Sri Lanka. When you say that “IWRM is not in action” (something which I can already agree with you) I was reminded that IWRM is a process and, in one way or another, it will be very difficult to find any country in which one could say that IWRM is 100% in practice. What we can look into are indicators, processes, and a key word: change. IWRM is about development and this is about change. “Change management” is a topic which we also need to be close to, and the tools and skills involved will be a positive contribution for individual and institutional change processes.

      • #7585

        Yes, I agree. The capacity development on IWRM has been placed for more than 10 years in Sri Lanka, so there are some improvements of participation from all stakeholders for water related projects in Sri Lanka. but this is not 100% achieved. As I mentioned in a below comment, specially the related activities such as settlements, urban planning are not really participatory with the water management authorities in the country. Inter-sector participation in planning is actually lacking and leading for so many issues for water resource management.

  • #7573
    Profile picture of
    Asmelash
    Participant

    In my country Ethiopia all stakeholders are involving mostly in the planning but with limited participation in the decision making and management. The decision making and management should be in participatory and integrated approach for the sustainability of the projects being implemented. The participation of stakeholders specially in the planning stage can be seen as evidence of commitment to integrated water resources management. Groundwater has been utilized everywhere in Ethiopia without specified regulations and I think the water knowledge needed to move in to IWRM should be on sustainability of the water resource in both quantity and quality aspects. When water governance is not effective, the main looser is the community and then the nation as a whole.

    • #7582
      Profile picture of
      Damian Indij
      Keymaster

      This is an interesting situation: stakeholders are involved in planning but with limited participation in decision making and management. This shows some level of commitment, but it also shows that much is still pending. What do you think are the procedures in place which enable their participation in planning? And which are pending processes (systems, institutions, steps, etc.) to enable that they also take part in decision making and management? Let´s try to continue with this discussion.

      • #7635
        Profile picture of
        Rosario Barranquero
        Participant

        I consider very interesting discusses about the stakeholder participation since in many cases they are called to water resources management but they are not true participation. For a genuine participation I believe that the first step is the community sensitization. Once this awareness has been possible the stakeholders should have an essential tool which is the knowledge of the system about which expected the participation. The achievement of these steps is a process and cannot be assumed to be achieved soon, or in a couple of meetings with the community. The true stakeholder’s involvement only is possible gradually. When these two steps were achieved is necessary build channels and strategies of participation for each local community. If the actors not participate in the definition of these channels and strategies the participation couldn’t been possible.

  • #7583
    Profile picture of
    Tshepo Setlhogile
    Participant

    In Botswana, stakeholder participation in planning and decision making for the water sector is mainly done at the ministry level with the affected department making its input to that effect. Economic planners at the ministry level are more engaged with the Department interms of the type of projects and activities to consider for integration into the National Development Planning Process. There is lack of effective representation of stakeholders at decision levels particularly at local level exacerbated by weak capacities to understand and implement water resources management. There are no water user platforms for enhanced awareness.
    In terms of commitment to IWRM, the country has recently developed the national IWRM-water efficiency plan that is currently being implemented, although the process is slow.
    When governance is not effective, the service provider and the users lose. The service provider incurs increased costs, while the user also has to pay more for the service or incur going some days without access to reticulated water.

    • #7607
      Profile picture of
      Damian Indij
      Keymaster

      Thanks so much for your illustrative response. I wonder how far can one call a national plan under the circumstances you are describing (related to the top-down approach and limited participation). Do you think there is awareness about the need to improve this? If there is, then the glass can be still seen half-full. If there is not, then the situation is more delicate. And if there is awareness, what kind of capacities and for whom do you think should be strengthened?

  • #7584

    Hi every one, very interesting question Damian, for starting the course.

    I would like to comment in both backgrounds from Sri Lanka where I was born and bread, and from Brazil where I am living now. What I see in both countries majority who are suffering from lack of water resources and unsafe sanitation is poor communities. They are the group never consulted in the planning process or in the management. This has led to so much of pollution that worsen the situation/ management issues, and even lead complexity in water allocation decisions. Participatory planning is very important to get people involved in the process of allocating scarce water resource, and to self-realize their own wrong practices that affect water, and to allocate water in equality for all. There are evidences that water management authorities in both countries commit and apply practicing of IWRM in many projects, but movement is required to make plans for saving and protecting water resources with the involvement of communities. Management will become complicated more and more with water pollution, so that this is where the community and other stakeholders participation is required, not only in the allocation. On-the-ground knowledge and capacity development is required for water and land management together (even from the land use and building planning). Otherwise government loose economically and people loose safe water, and healthy environment, and finally their lives. I think this answers all of the questions raised. I enjoyed reading all answers above, actually those are very valid. Thanks all..

  • #7588
    Profile picture of
    Richard Mutua
    Participant

    In Kenya Integrated water resources management is pretty well practiced even to the lowest level since 1999 when when the first national water policy was first enacted and followed two years later by the water Act 2002. The process was informed by the IWRM. When finally the Water Act came into force in 2003, things went smoothly until it was time for some people and institutions started losing their high profile positions due to the reforms. IWRM is a process, it is integrated and bottom up. The rest is top bottom and sectoral. While now decision making is done at very low levels, there are still those who resist this. An example is the planners at national level and budget makers. when they hear grassroots groups need to be financed, they resist and give all manner of excuses. They still believe in the holier than thou attitude which mainly was driven by corruption. Imagine a decision to sink a borehole in the middle of nowhere just because the officer concerned is interested in the kick-backs provided by a contractor and not driven by need!

  • #7596
    Profile picture of
    SEVERE FOSSI TUEKAM
    Participant

    In my country, Cameroon, stakeholders are very popular in decisions regarding the management of water resources, and for three reasons:1) some stakeholders do not even know that they can claim the right to speak; the technochrates that manage water resources, tend to want to think and decide for all users; 3) the IWRM approach to water management in Cameroon is very recent and still little known by managers. Unfortunately, it is the taxpayer, the country’s economy and well-being of the people who pay the price. We hope that through training, information and awareness, the state, civil society and people will eventually act differently.

    • #7601
      Profile picture of
      Eunice Kivuva
      Participant

      I agree with my colleague Richard from Kenya that, here exist well stipulated guidelines in that direct integrated water resource management practice in Kenya. With the COK 2010, there was formulation of Water Bill 2014 though not finalized but at it its final phases to implementation. The bill gives water users and citizens in general more powers promoting integrated water resource management. Water is a human right in Kenya, and the national and county governments are working hard to facilitate participatory approach in integrated Water Resource management. The civil Societies in Kenya in collaboration with line ministries at the county governments and national government are taking fundamental steps to empower water resource ambassadors at the grassroots for efficient management of the limited commodity. Water resources Users Associations (WRUAS) have been formed in various Counties to support integrated approach in the management of water resources. However, as my Colleague stipulates, their exist a great challenge of corruption that slows down the process and makes it hard for the grass root ambassadors to perform.

  • #7598
    Profile picture of
    Ruth Katebe
    Participant

    Evening Damian thanks , to answer the questions you asked I would say first of all people shuold know that they have a right to Water. They need to know that they have a right to take part in all the decision makings ,planning processes and be able to speak out where they feel that the government or the stakeholders are not fulfiling or keeping to there promises towards providing the people With clean and safe water. They should know how to track funds that are allocated to there area and see if the money is being used according to what they have been given. Such information should be made know to the people that have little or no knowledge about water and their rights to water.

    • #7609
      Profile picture of
      Damian Indij
      Keymaster

      Thanks for mentioning the right to water, something we firmly believe in and advocate for. But also something which needs to be explored and understood: exactly what rights are we talking about? And, whenever there are rights, there are obligations, who´s assuming then? Who´s controlling? A lot to look for in the water sector! You can revise a draft version of our new training manual on a Human Rights Based Approach to IWRM, which we did with WaterLex , REDICA, and Water Governance Facility at SIWI.

  • #7599
    Profile picture of
    Nwoko Chidinma
    Participant

    In my country Nigeria, water has been a the basic problem to the poor due to overlooked of the stakeholders which are supposed to help in decision marking on how to implement this plan in other to help the poor masses.this is because each sectors try to have a uniform plan but it dose not work because each sectors want to be on their own in decision making and dthem coming together to implement this plan will not work because their is no room for colabration among them that can held a very good result. This also due to the type of political condition in my country.since we have have no water knowledge management strategy there is a big challenge for us to reach out to communities.this made the poor to loose when water governance is not effective because they don’t have a way to reach out to the stakeholders who can help in planing and making decision on how to this issue in other.therefore,there is a communication gap between the poor and the stoke broker.

  • #7600
    Profile picture of
    Nwoko Chidinma
    Participant

    In my country Nigeria, water has been a the basic problem to the poor due to overlooked of the stakeholders which are supposed to help in decision marking on how to implement this plan in other to help the poor masses.this is because each sectors try to have a uniform plan but it dose not work because each sectors want to be on their own in decision making and them coming together to implement this plan will not work because their is no room for colabration among them that can held a very good result. This also due to the type of political condition in my country.since we have no water knowledge management strategy there is a big challenge for us to reach out to communities.this made the poor to loose when water governance is not effective because they don’t have a way to reach out to the stakeholders who can help in planing and making decision on how to this issue in other.therefore,there is a communication gap between the poor and the stakeholders

    • #7610
      Profile picture of
      Damian Indij
      Keymaster

      Thanks Diamond for your contribution, I may identify some key messages to share with the rest of the participants: i) when water governance is not working, the most who suffer are the poor; ii) each sector wants to have their plan and their decision making process and there is no room for collaboration; iii) there is no strategy in place; iv) there is a communication between the poor and the other stockholders. If you had to chance to start doing something about this, what would it be? Something realistic which would make a contribution and would be feasible to be continued. What would you do?

  • #7602
    Profile picture of
    Elizabeth Unger
    Participant

    My perspective comes from Iceland, where according to the definition of IWRM, this form of management is essentially non-existent. A reasonable explanation to this is that the population of Iceland is roughly 320,000 and fresh water is far from becoming a scarce resource (rivers and lakes cover roughly 6% of land). The economy is also still recovering, so funds in the municipalities are limited, restricting action. While in the United States, water usage is measured by meters at household, this is not implemented in Iceland. Rather, usage is estimated according to the size of the home. Unfortunately, water quality is not monitored and measured regularly as it is New England area, where the information and data are fairly accessible and transparent. See for example, http://newengland.water.usgs.gov/ . The New England area also has less water.

    When considering the stakeholder groups in Iceland, I argue that the stakeholder with the strongest grasp over water is the national power company, which seeks to harness the hydro power which is then used to support the heavy industry in Iceland. There is a democratic process that proceeds any project by holding open forums that give the public the opportunity to approve or dispute the project. The company is also expected to perform environmental assessments along with calculating the cost and benefits.

    The point that emerges for me in this discussion is that “creative” management happens when the resource is at a critical threshold of becoming scarce. I think it would be interesting to monetize the cost of waiting until water reaches the typical threshold and compare it to the potential benefits of beginning IWRM before that threshold hits.

    • #7611
      Profile picture of
      Damian Indij
      Keymaster

      Hi Elizabeth, and thanks for your post. I took a look at the site of the New England Water Science Centre, really impressive, lots of information publically and easy available. I agree with you that unfortunately we mostly care for things we seem to be close to loose them. This also brings me closer to my own perspective on water, which is much more closer to the human and society angle than to water per se. “Creative” management and “change” management are two entry points which I´m now starting to see more often in water discussions, and welcome that!

      Monetizing the cost of waiting is a good idea. However, things get still more difficult as the cost of the bill will usually be paid by the next politician in place. We can see this in the efforts towards adaptation to climate change, so much is pending to do, but both consequences and benefits will be seen in the medium run, and decision makers seem to care more for today. In my session at courses or when working with schools I like very much to exercise in developing a vision. Let´s dream again for the future.

    • #7615
      Profile picture of
      Nwoko Chidinma
      Participant

      First i will like to create awareness to the to the stakeholders on how to implemented and put in pratice the IWRM plan so that by doing this every one will be give the opportunity to exin decision and policy marking. there will be need to move up the water access rating to cover a larger proportion of the population as well as the number of people who have access to modern sanitation,in order to enhance the quality of life.I will try to tell all the sectors that are involve in water governance the need for colabration work in other to achieve a good result concerning intergraty of water management to the poor and the country at large.There is also the need to pay greater attention to increasing the supply of water for irrigation purposes, in areas of less rainfall
      and those susceptible to drought, as well as protecting vulnerable habitats from sea erosion and the possible adverse effects of sea level rise.
      The logical framework of the strategy to be adopted must recognise the need for the interdependence between resources sustainability and the development process. The critical elements of the strategy should necessarily find anchor in the broad objective of the country’s National Policy in the Environment,which recognises the need to
      •Secure for all Nigerians, a quality of environment that is adequate for human well- being.
      •Conserve and use all environmental and natural resources for the benefit of present and future generations

  • #7605
    Profile picture of
    Brajesh Tomar
    Participant

    In my country India, water policy in place at country level as well as state level and clearly mentioned water use priority as drinking water have first and then agriculture, ecology and industries etc. There are three major departments in general who plan and develop water resources are Public Health Engineering Department for drinking water, irrigation department for agriculture and groundwater development. Earlier there were no coordination between these departments and every department have their own priority and plans. But few year ago, in many states government merged all departments and created new department as water resource development department. But the functioning at ground level is still separate and lack of coordination.

    Participation of stakeholders in planning and decision making is still lacking and government officers are see local community as trouble creator. Participatory irrigation management is implemented in many states and some states has done very successfully. There are many gaps in community participation in decision making process. This will only possible when ground level officers behaving like water managers instead of officers/engineers and they must have orientation about IWRM.

    Poor governance is mainly affect poor people because dominated people can access water by any means.

    • #7714
      Profile picture of
      Damian Indij
      Keymaster

      Thanks so much for your comment. I find a couple of interesting things which illustrative the complexity of the subject: drinking water is no. 1 priority (sounds good), but probably no.1 consumer is food production, I wonder how the challenge of providing water for people, for food, energy, and industry will work in fast developing India. Very interesting to see there were actions taken towards coordination, but in practice things remain separated and uncoordinated, this example would be good for an in-depth approach.

      “Ground level officers behaving like water managers”, I guess that most of us following this course might have a similar understanding (and agree) with this phrase, the question is: do ground level officers and the people above them understand this?

      And finally, poor governance affects most the poor, we always need to keep this fact very clear…and do something about it.

  • #7606
    Profile picture of
    Rafatou FOFANA
    Participant

    • In Benin : we are bulding the institutional framework in order to promote stakeholders involment at all phase of planng, decision making and management. We look at the basin level (including sub-basin, local where the is an IWRM stake), the national level and the transboundary level. Nowadays, stakeholders are at 65% sucessful involved in planning, decision making, and management.

    • The 35% shortcoming is due to how to select the best representative of groups /actors when they are not yet organized.
    • The evidence of commitment to integrated water resources management in Benin is the availability of tools such us: i) water law since 2010 in french and in local language, ii) IWRM Plan, iii) Master Development Plan for Oueme basin managment
    • To move into IWRM, we quantitative and qualitative knowledge about water ressources ; we need also to know users and usages
    • When water governance is not effective, poor population looses

    • #7715
      Profile picture of
      Damian Indij
      Keymaster

      Hi Rafatou and thanks for your comment. Good to see that things in Benin are moving forward!

  • #7614
    Profile picture of
    Alex Lane
    Participant

    Hi everyone. Speaking from an Australian perspective, I think one of our most important constraints on effective water management is political timescales. Elections, at both national and state level, occur every three years and (in my opinion) this leads to short-terminism and a lack of truly long-term and strategic planning in water management. It also makes it hard for businesses (or any stakeholder for that matter) plan how their projects can use water sustainably – political posturing in the lead up to elections and the bureaucracy required to get new policies implemented post elections means a lot of uncertainty for all stakeholders. I’d be interested to hear how politics is influencing water management in your own countries.

    • #7647
      Profile picture of
      Damian Indij
      Keymaster

      Hi and thanks for your comment. Nice to hear from you in Australia! I agree with your comment and I think a key concept here is “State Policies” by this I mean the policies which show a real commitment from a country, and which survive the change in administrations every 3-4 years. Which ones of us can really identify a state policy which is so strong and committed to development that will be a driving principle in the long run? I´d have a difficult time to find an example like this from my country, Argentina. How can these state policies be built?

  • #7616

    The water resources in Sudan are very difficult to be managed, due to instability in the country and the variation of the climate and its temporal nature, so from my point of view I think water management is so difficult especially when you consider ground water management.

    Jaafer Mohammed Ahmed

    • #7631
      Profile picture of
      Fatma Ibnouf
      Participant

      I agree with you Jaafar to a certain extent, but not completely. I do think that endeavor to achieve sustainable water management will be succeeding if the needs of all water users are addressed adequately. This included in particularly women and women farmers. This is because women are main user of water and they are usually spend numerous hours carrying water over long distances, especially in dry season in rural areas. My research indicates water collection is time-consuming tasks and absorbs a considerable amount of women time daily in western Sudan. This is because water shortage problems in rural Western Sudan are common, especially in area that depends on surface sources. Women walk long distances and spend hours searching for water sources in years of low rainfall. So, women should share decision in water management, not only in my country but worldwide

  • #7630

    First and foremost I would to thank the informative discussions above. In my country Swaziland, the overall management of water resources is on an ad hoc basis through several uncoordinated pieces of legislation, spread among a number of Ministries as well as other institutions outside the government. In 2006,GWP partnered with Swaziland Government to form the Swaziland Water Partnership.
    This partnership helped to promote an enhanced understanding of the importance of IWRM in National Economic Development among non-traditional water sectors, such as the Ministry of Economic Planning , Finance, media, private sector (Sugar Corporations), and youth community.
    Now as a country we need to promote technologies that for adaptation and mitigating the impacts of climate change. Currently, with the assistance of UNICEF the country is piloting Sand dams construction. This programme is aimed at harvesting rain water during summer rainy days for storage. This is one of the climate change adaptation strategies in water resources management. The sand dam concept is mostly prevalent in drought prone countries. Due to the observed impacts of climate change this technology is being piloted in five sites in the country and I am hands-on in the implementation of this programme. Sand dams are low-maintenance technology recommended as cost-effective method for water conservation in dry-land environments. The aim is to develop climate change resilient community schemes to improve water resource management.
    However, with the extent of the impacts of climate this is not enough.

    • #7644
      Profile picture of
      Damian Indij
      Keymaster

      Thanks for your inputs and good to know that GWP is making a good contribution in your country. Again, we see in your comments a similar status in terms of lack of coordination at the national level. But we also see some very good things going on terms, both in terms of institutional development through the Country Water Partnership and with UNICEF in the work towards climate change adaptation. It looks like a good example of the multidimensions of situations taking place simultaneously, and we may look forward for an increased attention for those things which are going well and can drive change.

  • #7632
    Profile picture of
    Olumide A. Odeyemi
    Participant

    In Nigeria as reiterated by Diamond, participation of various stakeholders in planning, decision making, and management is quite limited. Many factors contribute to this. I must state that we have all its takes for a committed public engagement in important issues such as this. However, due to lack of good political will and direct involvement the public in decision-making, water management issue remain relegated. Water education and water management awareness are important for moving into IWRM. The masses who do not have direct participation in decision-making and planning.

  • #7634
    Profile picture of
    Eunice Kivuva
    Participant

    For efficient sustainable water management it is advisable to link good governance with WASH. The public should be actively involved in critical water related decision making as well as considering stakeholders and authority in water management. Stakeholder engagement and participatory approach is critical for climate change mitigation. In Kenya, the participatory approach has been realized through the development of Strategic Management plans (SCAMPS) and water Resource Users Associations (WRUAs). The water users have been actively involved in the development of SCAMPS and protection of the catchments and natural resources for efficient water resource management. The formulation of water bill 2014 that is in its final parliamentary amendments, and give power to the WRUAs was done on participatory process. Public forums were held and stakeholders made their inputs to the bill. Although not experienced in the whole country, the issue of Gender mainstreaming has also been considered in the management process for the WRUAS at various counties in Kenya. This should be replicated in the 47 Counties and the whole world for sustainable water management.

    • #7645
      Profile picture of
      Damian Indij
      Keymaster

      Thanks for your comment and for linking water governance with WASH. Glad to see in Kenya an active work in strategic plans and by the water Resource Users Associations. Are water utilities also involved? And well done for including a gender perspective. Looks like a nice process to happening over there.

  • #7636
    Profile picture of
    Rosario Barranquero
    Participant

    I think that in the comments made we can visualize that the complexity of integrated water management is a common characteristic. The inadecuate resources management is in the first instance an environmental problem and as such is composed of multiple components and they interactions. Argentina is not an exception of this complexity level mainly because it is a large country in latitudinal sense, with a great diversity of eco-regions, socio-economic realities and cultural manifestations.

    • #7646
      Profile picture of
      Damian Indij
      Keymaster

      Thanks Rosario for your comments. I´m also from Argentina and it´s nice to see your recognition of the diverse environments in our country (as in any country). In many occasions there is a unique assessment of a country situation and this can´t be applied to the water sector, each place has its own situation, and to make it even more complex, climate change will have different impacts in different places (floods, droughts).

  • #7638
    Profile picture of
    Ali Bakari
    Participant

    In Nigeria, the participation of local stakeholders (especially primary water users or water user groups) in decision making and planning is extremely rare. In this respect, all the decisions for the management of water resources are carried out by the strategic stakeholders ( government officials) in their respective departments and agencies. Also, most of the agencies are having overlap of functions; as the responsibility of managing water resources is vested on all the three tiers of government (federal, state, and local). The only solution to this multi-faceted problem is to review the existing framework and carve a niche for active participation of primary stakeholders at the lowest level in order to achieve sustainability.

    • #7703
      Profile picture of
      Damian Indij
      Keymaster

      Thanks very much for your comment. I agree with your diagnosis. I also remained thinking on who are the “strategic stakeholders”, another way to go (or as part of the framework revision that you suggest) is to understand to all are strategic stakeholders, and thus promote the necessary things for them to be informed, and later may participate.

  • #7639
    Profile picture of
    Ebele Amaechina
    Participant

    Hello everyone. Damian you asked a critical question in terms of what can be done differently to improve the situation painted about my country Nigeria. I suggest that platforms for stakeholder dialogues be created. This is for stakeholders at horizontal (at the same level) and vertical (amongst different stakeholders with varying influence, power and interest). For instance a ‘town hall’ meeting on water resources can be held, say, quarterly at the state, local or community level, bringing together various stakeholders. These meetings will be facilitated by NGOs well versed in the issues. This will afford the public opportunity to ask questions, state their needs and make demands on the government. Also the government can explain their direction, and from the dialogue, modify to meet the needs of the people. This will help to make the voice of the poor to be heard, and facilitate free flow of information between stakeholders and promote transparency. it will require intentionality to make the poor access the opportunity and be heard.
    I am particularly bothered about the water management situation in my country because Nigeria is one of the countries projected to get into water stress by 2025 due to natural( climate change) and man-made( population growth,etc) factors, if water use and management continue in the same fashion. Although our water policy recognizes IWRM principles, there is a wide gap between policy intentions and the conversion of the intentions into concrete action.

    • #7704
      Profile picture of
      Damian Indij
      Keymaster

      Very good idea! Thanks. There are lots of materials related to conflict resolution and communication which should be considered for such dialogues, the difficulty is that some differences (in power) still remain and we need to know how to be prepared and handle them. You may check one of Cap-Net´s manual on the topic.

  • #7640
    Profile picture of
    Ebele Amaechina
    Participant

    Lanea, the political limitation to efficient water management is a factor not only in your country, but in mine (Nigeria) as well. Politicians have short terms to govern and want to be re-elected, so they want to focus on ‘visible’ high profile projects. Now some water projects, like rural water supply or Irrigation infrastructure installation or rehabilitation are not as visible as urban water supply and other projects like education, health, and road construction. There are many rural areas and fewer urban areas so they focus on water for Urban areas ( where at all they want to do water projects), and leave out the poor in the rural areas who need water both for domestic uses and livelihoods ( agriculture). They are also not very interested in water projects because of the long standing failure to recoup from users for Operation and maintenance by the water agencies. Many water infrastructure, both for domestic and irrigation are dilapidated. Also a low priority for them is investing in the ‘soft’ aspect of water resource management like building capacity for IWRM.

    • #7656
      Profile picture of
      Alex Lane
      Participant

      I couldn’t agree more. The short-term preoccupation of government’s is so frustrating! I think the only way the ‘state policies’ Damian referred to can come to fruition is through sustained calls for action from individuals and communities. I think that the rapid developments in social media in the last few years provide a really valuable tool in this respect; they provide a powerful tool to make political leaders sit up and listen and through which concerted efforts to achieve truly integrated water management can be shown to be what people want. Alex

    • #7705
      Profile picture of
      Damian Indij
      Keymaster

      Yes, sometimes we don´t see water until we don´t have it. And usually those who don´t have are the poor and then we don´t want to see them too. By “we” I´m referring to a generic for our societies, anywhere.

  • #7641
    Profile picture of
    Tshepo Setlhogile
    Participant

    These are great discussions colleagues. IWRM implementation and good governance in the water sector is complex indeed and cannot be achieved in a short period of time.
    Communication between the poor and other stakeholders is often a difficult process. But i think water user associations at the local level are very important. Representatives of these groups can dialogue with civil society groups who would then pass the concerns, ideas, opinions of the poor communities to the decision makers. In Botswana, we use NGOs to facilitate this. However, NGOs require funding to function and at the moment they are struggling given our new status as a middle income country ( most donors have pulled out). We also use the village gathering system where meetings are held with the public/local communities at a central place within the village ( usually a traditional law court area) to facilitate discussions on pertinent issues in the country. The problem is that water issues currently are sensitive and highly politicized.

    • #7706
      Profile picture of
      Damian Indij
      Keymaster

      Thanks for your comment. I share the thought on the value of local NGOs, that´s why it is so important to strengthen them with various skills, including management, finance, planning, communications…etc.

  • #7643

    The problem we have in developing countries, Sudan in particular, that the concept of participatory approach in IWRM is not applied at all especially when you come to the involvement of farmers and commitment to engage and empower the local people.

  • #7651
    Profile picture of
    jaime huanca
    Participant

    In Bolivia, in fact, the water planning proccess is still weak. Who do planning are the oganizations related to water for agriculture irrigation, and they have even, a political power at the present government level. In many places the decision making, particularly in rural areas, at wateshed levels, communities from the upper part are not part of the decisions.

    The Plan Nacional de Cuencas (National plan of watersheds) since 2010 is implementing IWRM and IWM approach, by mean of projects. The observed effects and impacts are still low, we see it is not easy to implement IWRM in the short term.

    • #7716
      Profile picture of
      Damian Indij
      Keymaster

      Hola Jaime and thanks for sharing news from Bolivia. I think you brought a new indicator for all of us to include in our working table: Time. IWRM takes time and it´s a process. It also important to aim for continuity and build on what has been done. A typical problem is that governments change, institutional memory is lost, and everything seems to be always starting when usually there are always past experiences to follow, learn from, or improve (if needed)

  • #7652
    Profile picture of
    Indra Nurdianyoto
    Participant

    Hi everyone in Indonesia all stakeholders are involved in planning, decision making and management which summarized in variety of coordination body i.e coordination at provincial and basin levels carried out by Provincial Water Resources Management Committee and Basin Water Resources Management Committee called Coordination Team of Water Resources Management. This Coordination body have balance number membership between government and non government organization in order to have policy integration and to achieve understanding and harmony of needs among sectors, regions and stakeholders.
    But in early 2015 the Constitutional Court of the Republic of Indonesia (MK-RI) in bringing the lawsuit judicial review petition Act No. 7/2004 on Water Resources against 1945 Constitution of the Republic of Indonesia has passed a decision on February 18th, 2015 stating Act No. 7 of 2004 does not have binding legal force and Act No. 11/1974 concerning watering declared valid.
    Thereby making all activities refer to Act No. 7/2004 became on hold waiting for laws and regulations as derivative rule Act No. 11/1974 published from Ministry of Public Works and Public Housing until the enactment of new law on water resources.
    -Indra Nurdianyoto-

    • #7750
      Profile picture of
      Damian Indij
      Keymaster

      Dear Indra, thanks for your comment and for bring the legal dimension in the discussions, something we shall see in depth in module 3

  • #7657
    Profile picture of
    Ramadhan Mohammed
    Participant

    Adding sustainability as measuring factor to IWRM to be SIWRM will help to define the limitations needed to identify the value of possible impacts of what and how are using our water resources to rethink about what we doing now.
    Sustainability is a relative concept that is Appling to our environment which undergoing multiple changes, changes that are occurring over different temporal and spatial scales.
    Our water resource systems are our survival and welfare. We have to restore them in the face of increasing development pressures for land in their watersheds and for water in their streams, rivers, lakes, and aquifers.

    • #7751
      Profile picture of
      Damian Indij
      Keymaster

      Thanks Ramadhan for the comment and for bringing the sustainability principle as well as the value of nature!

  • #7669
    Profile picture of
    Bhawan Singh
    Participant

    In Canada many all stakeholders (various levels of government, various users across sectors (agriculture, industry, energy, recreation…) are involved in planning, decision making, and management.
    This participatory and integrated approach is practiced to try to ensure water availability for all users and maintaining water quality.
    The evidence of commitment to integrated water resources management lies in the implication of stakeholders across competing sectors
    The type of “water knowledge” needed to move into IWRM is the acceptance of the fact that water is a finite resource and it is needed to satisfy a number of economic and social needs: drinking water, food, manufacturing, energy, recreation…
    The population at large looses when water governance is not effective, especially the most vulnerable groups (children, the poor, women…)

    • #7752
      Profile picture of
      Damian Indij
      Keymaster

      Thanks Bhawan for your comment. It might be expected that things in Canada could be well oriented. So let´s move the expectations up for them, what can you tell us about access to information and accountability? How transparent is water governance? And what about gender mainstreaming in water management? Just moving into things we will discuss later in the course.

  • #7672

    In Jamaica, the major issue of IWRM is the rift between the decision-makers and the most vulnerable ie women and children and as such the availability of water to meet the needs of the population as well as industry is not always possible. With water now being a limiting resource due to climate change and the issue of an ongoing drought, it has been brought into perspective the importance of IWRM. As such it is hoped that all stakeholders inclusive of vulnerable groups will be now included in future plans and decision-making.

    • #7753
      Profile picture of
      Damian Indij
      Keymaster

      Hi Wendy, thanks for your comment. For are bringing two key elements to be considered for effective water management: gender mainstreaming and climate change adaptation. We will not achieve any of the various sustainable development goals without considering them. In the content box for module 1 I included a link to the climate change tutorial, and you can also take a look at the gender mainstreaming one.

  • #7674
    Profile picture of
    Mutaz Al-Alawi
    Participant

    I am Mutaz from Jordan. The dimension of uncertainty was chosen in order to explore questions concerning government
    future regulatory, policy-making and managerial powers and responsibilities. Movements to
    management and even ownership of many of water systems to lower levels of government, and in
    some cases to the private sector, have accelerated recently, but it is not all clear how far such efforts
    will get. Government involvement in water management has covered areas of water policy
    formulation, water resources development, monitoring, and data collection. For two scenarios, we
    have chosen to characterize it as dominant. In such futures, the government would continue to take
    the lead on standard setting and would have strong involvement in enforcement, water allocation, and
    centralized data collection. The other two scenarios envision a reduced government role. These future
    attempts to capture the potential devolution of some governmental powers, roles, and responsibilities.

    • #7755
      Profile picture of
      Damian Indij
      Keymaster

      Dear Mutaz thanks for your comment. The issue of uncertainty looks like a correct way to start, especially in a context of climate change. A “strong” government is also key for water management, regardless of all our efforts to promote participation, this will not diminish the role of a strong government, policy making, and decision making. But a strong democratic, participatory, and transparent government. That is why, we talk about an “enabling environment”, a context with the correct “ingredients” for effective water management. Balance, continuity, and strategic progress is needed. Leadership, as you mention, is an important aspect. Not only in governments, but also from NGOs, and various water user groups.

  • #7675
    Profile picture of
    Elizabeth Unger
    Participant

    Hello again, this is Elizabeth. There is a very strong economic argument for the importance of addressing gender equity in the context of climate change. If females workers are concentrated into one sector (agriculture or fisheries, for example) coupled with lack of mitigation to climate change, this could potentially lead to high levels of unemployment. Obviously.

    In some of my research, I came across an interesting tool at the World Economic Forum’s website. It is a repository where users can look at other businesses in different industrializes worldwide that have implemented different types of programs that aim at closing the gender gap. Follow this link to read about it http://www.weforum.org/videos/closing-gender-gap-repository-best-practices.

    I would like to know from the participants if there have been any programs (for example, mentoring or awareness) in the field of IWRM. If so, it might be worthwhile to post your experience and results on WEF repository found here: http://www.weforum.org/gender-parity/closing-gender-gap.

    • #7760
      Profile picture of
      Damian Indij
      Keymaster

      Hi Elizabeth, thanks for sharing. I´ll take a look at the sites you are suggesting, and remind all participants about this in my next mail. Meanwhile, as I did earlier today in my response to Wendy, I also share with you Cap-Net´s tutorial in gender mainstreaming: Why Gender Matters in IWRM: A tutorial for water managers

  • #7725
    Profile picture of
    Luis Romito
    Participant

    Dear Damian:in the document Module 1: Introduction to sustainable water management in a climate change context, in 2.2 Principles of effective water governance, Transparency and Participation have the same explanation.

    • #7761
      Profile picture of
      Damian Indij
      Keymaster

      Thanks, I´ll take a look at this, Danmian

  • #7768

    Hello,

    In my country, all stakeholders are not involved in decision making in many cases! However authorities tries more and more to implement the concept of IWRM in water projects. But one of the problems of IWRM implementation in my country is the hight rate of illeteracy.

  • #7869
    Profile picture of
    Bishesh Aryal
    Participant

    Hello

    In my country Nepal entire stakeholder take part in planning as well as implementing phase but at the mean time significance participation of women and marginalized are less. On the basic of benefit and influence stakeholder get involved. Nowadays, integrated approach is came at an forefront for sound management of water and resources. Basically water users committee at grass root level practice integrated approach. Integrated water resource management centric development practices is best to enhance water knowledge. Likewise, Reviving traditional water management system and capitalizing its good aspect and element is also next additional praise worthy things for better water knowledge. Planner, decision maker, implementer and individual citizen will be the victim for poor water governance practice.

  • #8210
    Profile picture of
    Ramadhan Mohammed
    Participant

    In Iraq for the implementation of policies and programs for sustainable integrated water resources management ‘SIWRM’ there is a clear and urgent need to review and analyze the water resources sector, in order to provide an enabling environment (policy and planning, institutional, legal and financial / economic aspects).

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.