Home Forums WI25 – Discussion forum module 4

Profile picture of

This topic contains 13 replies, has 13 voices, and was last updated by  mayhps 6 months ago.

  • Author
    Posts
  • #19888

    Welcome to the forum discussion for module 4!

    In preparation for the forum discussion participants are advised to watch the following two of the recommended videos, one combining various cases concerning services provision in the urban context in Asia and the second with an example from the rural context in Costa Rica.

    Deepening Local Democratic Governance through Social Accountability in Asia
    https://youtu.be/0JoZRXZM1DU

    Accountability in the water sector – Costa Rica
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cmK6scQlvOc

    After watching these two videos, please share your experiences and thoughts on one or more of the following questions:
    • How do the examples in the videos relate to the four pillars of the Integrity Wall as pictured in the Water Integrity Global Outlook 2016?
    • Do you perceive any gaps in the way integrity issues have been addressed e.g. phenomena of corruption or malpractice, role of institutions, continuity of the process of change?
    • If you came across an integrity issue in your own context, what would be your approach to deal with it?

  • #20039
    Profile picture of
    mghema
    Participant

    One of the Community Water Supply Project that we implemented, we almost used the four pillars of integrity wall for deciding the governance structure for the community water supply schemes. 24 no of community water supply schemes were constructed and their governance structure/ownership/operation and maintenance responsibility were decided by giving weight on the transparency, accountability, participation and anti-corruption aspects which were observed during construction of the water supply schemes.

    the following models were adopted considering above:

    1. Asset ownership and O&M – Community organization themselves
    2. Asset ownership -the local government body, O&M – a Community organization
    3. Asset ownership and O&M – the Local government body

  • #20040
    Profile picture of
    Ayebale
    Participant

    Hello Every one,
    Hope everything is alright out there.
    How do the examples in the videos relate to the four pillars of the Integrity Wall as pictured in the Water Integrity Global Outlook 2016?
    In the videos shown, i come to realize indeed to achieve integrity in all kinds of lives, the last resort would still be Transparency, Accountability, Participation and the Anti corruption measures that would be put in place. Thses principles create trust right from the marginalised to the top ladder.

    Do you perceive any gaps in the way integrity issues have been addressed e.g. phenomena of corruption or malpractice, role of institutions, continuity of the process of change?
    In regards to the videos, the integrity issues were really well addressed, its seen forexample for institution in Costa Rica got a good plan of following up on issues.

    If you came across an integrity issue in your own context, what would be your approach to deal with it?
    An integrity issue is well addressed by involving all stake holders but mostly the marginalised. They are the ones always at a loosing side if there is an integrity issue. To make things right, the marginslised are somehow the pillars of integrity. Participation can play a big role even in finding a solution to the already existing issue.

    I stand to be corrected please.
    Thanks every one.

  • #20041
    Profile picture of
    Hmaidi
    Participant

    although the two videos talk about key principles of transparency, accountability and participation, it should be noticed that none of these stands alone; a number of projects ere claimed to be built with these concepts and pillars taken into consideration, but realities were different. transparency with clear role to each stakeholder becomes only a slogan, limited participation ( as it was indicated that citizens cleaned tanks!!) is not a real role, even information disclosure unless these information were verified and assured to be accurate are meaningless.
    I had a community meeting yesterday in Gaza on water and sanitation issues, the municipality has reported it as an openness and participation and involvement of local citizens and community groups in planning and decision making. but the way I have seen it was a session of listening to complaints and reporting of demands of the community including opening communication channels.an NGO involved reported that the mission is done, community is involved!!!
    on the other hand, there was no clear mechanism on what is next, how to proceed.

  • #20045
    Profile picture of
    George
    Participant

    Based on my observation especially on the Asian video, the scenario’s relationship to the four pillars of integrity wall is that: there was minimal transparency that affected the flow of information and the initial information was not consolidated in a central place, with regard to accountability, the citizens initially had no courage to approach the government and hold it accountable. On the other hand, public participation at the initial stages was lacking since the government did not provide a two way interactive process to engage the community, as far as un-corruption is concerned, there seems to be no law and regulation enforcement in the city due to the fact that the entire town is littered and waste management seems not to be working at all.

  • #20048
    Profile picture of
    haditabbara
    Participant

    How do the examples in the videos relate to the four pillars of the Integrity Wall as pictured in the Water Integrity Global Outlook 2016?

    I was particularly impressed with the ASADAs in Costa Rica. These rural associations have built integrity walls around them: Transparency, Accountability, Participation and anticorruption. They report to various levels of government that ensures they are performing well in the provision of drinking water services- quality and quantity.

    • Do you perceive any gaps in the way integrity issues have been addressed e.g. phenomena of corruption or malpractice, role of institutions, continuity of the process of change?

    An example is the ASADAs in Costa Rica. I am still not sure how did they evolve to be able to run the service themselves. What is the role of the government in terms of infrastructure costs (new equipment, rehabilitation). Anyway, one gap might be a stronger wall for anti-corruption via an ombudsman that these ASADA can refer to when confronted with corrupt government official.

    • If you came across an integrity issue in your own context, what would be your approach to deal with it?
    If it concerns citizen livelihood, then the short term approach is to deal with it head on- not accepting the lack of integrity as business as usual or customary. The long term approach is is to build an integrity wall.

  • #20050
    Profile picture of
    alvinwacha
    Participant

    I have watched both videos showing the contexts of both rural and urban relating to the integration of the pillars of integrity and can clearly see that all these pillars of transparency, accountability, participation and anti corruption can be successfully implemented in both contexts and have also learnt that for success to be achieved its important that measures are put in place to ensure some level of addressing issues under all the pillars at different levels by different sector actors for meaningful achievement to be observed and for the overall buy in and trust building of the sector by the community and other partners.

  • #20082
    Profile picture of
    Temple Oraeki
    Participant

    After watching both videos, I can confidently conclude that to reinstate transparency and accountability in the water sector, a lot of human capacity building is needed. Also, synergy amongst key stakeholders is imperative. From the first video, there wouldn’t have been any means to implement accountability if there are no data available in the sector. The four pillars of the integrity wall, all depend on availability of consolidated data. The various stakeholders involved would have to be trained on how to harness data through which the local govts. can be held accountable.

  • #20086
    Profile picture of
    Kassim
    Participant

    If I come across integrity in my own context, I would deal with it cautiously by analyzing the entire circumstances to find out if transparency, accountability, participation and anti-corruption had been ensured in all processes. One or more of the pillars may not be fulfilled or may be lacking, and so the first step is to find out where the gap exist and try to bridge that gap.

  • #20090
    Profile picture of
    CarolinaZijda
    Participant

    Kindly allow me to comment on the 1st video only as my internet hanged when I wanted to start watching the 2nd:

    Q 1: How do the examples in the videos relate to the four pillars of the Integrity Wall as pictured in the Water Integrity Global Outlook 2016?

    The video of Asia shows how they introduced a new concept, enabling the citizens to engage with the municipal. New ideas came from within the community, necessary data were disclosed and made available. As a result of working together trust and transparency were being build.

    Q 2:Do you perceive any gaps in the way integrity issues have been addressed e.g. phenomena of corruption or malpractice, role of institutions, continuity of the process of change?

    I especially noticed 2 things – There is much need for water services e.g. supplies but both government and private sector fail to provide essential services. This is partly due to the fact that institutions and people are not adequately equipped. However, this is important for continuation of the process of change. Secondly lack of data was a major hindrance to achieving integrity.

    Q 3: If you came across an integrity issue in your own context, what would be your approach to deal with it?
    First of all I would want to find out what is the exact nature of the integrity issue – I would also say that participation plays a big role in finding a solution to be able to bridge the gap.

    Regards, C

  • #20100
    Profile picture of
    Eman Rahamtalla
    Participant

    In the two videos, the two pillars of the integrity such as transparency and accountability are more clear in Costa-Rica than Asia. Participation is important and essrntial to ensure the sustainability of water services. The role of NGOs was not included in two examples.

  • #20258
    Profile picture of
    Lorna
    Participant

    The Deepening Local Democratic Governance through Social Accountability in Asia is similar to a project that I currently I’m in right now. The key pillars are TAP however, because of corruption some of these pillars are compromised. For example, the budget process is not open to all the members of the public therefore the budget makers cannot be held accountable. Suppressing participation is a way of ensuring that the responsible parties are not open with processes and therefore cannot be held accountable.

  • #20338

    (On behalf of Teun Bastemeijer)

    Good day to all, and apologies for my late reaction. Though not all participants appear to have posted their reactions on the three lead questions, it is encouraging to see the combination of the remarks made, showing that this module is helping to put water integrity concepts to practice. My reaction to the posts is a general one, and hope it does justice to all contributions.

    The combined reactions to the two videos form a good basis for further discussion and reflexion, and are inspiring with some good comments and examples of the relevance of various facets and perspectives of water governance and integrity. It is good to see that the combined videos help to better perceive the relevance of promoting water integrity in both the rural and urban contexts. Several posts explicitly address issues of corruption and point at the need for meaningful participation of communities including or in particular vulnerable and marginalised people or communities. The mention of intended use of the Water Integrity Wall and the four pillars to decide on the governance of community water supply schemes seems to point as the potential of this concept from the Water Integrity Global Outlook 2016 as a tool in support of participative stakeholder dialogue and planning. The remark about using this approach to build trust from the marginalised up to higher levels is very relevant. Indeed the marginalised (or more generally those who are supposed to benefit from sustainable and equitable water management and services) need to have a stronger and more influential voice, and under favourable policy and political conditions can help build the pillars of the integrity wall. To make that process successful, participation of various stakeholders and higher levels is essential.

    However, it’s sad that concepts of participation are not applied with honesty and lack transparency. In such cases this boils down to window dressing, lip service or establishing smoke screens to satisfy requirements of funding agencies, and “tick” the boxes in relation to regulatory requirements and legal provisions. Indeed there is a need for clear and explicit mechanisms that all parties can refer to and demand accountability. And indeed, several reactions point at the need for government to provide policy and regulatory environment that favours transparency, accountability and participation of civil society, communities and local level government bodies. This is an important element of building the capacity of the water sector to improve its performance, which is important in the context of SDG 6 and other water and sanitation related goals.

    Another good and more specific point that I noticed was about the need for building human capacities and the availability of consolidated data. I would interpret this as the combination of providing open access of relevant, concise and synthetic information and building the knowledge and skills among civil society, communities and local bodies to use and interpret that information in processes planning, budgeting, and monitoring the management and operation of water infrastructure and services. Several reactions related to this as well.

    In conclusion, it would seem that those participants who posted their reactions have learned from the module and are better equipped to promote water integrity, or in the terminology we promoted in the module, to help build the pillars of integrity walls in a multi stakeholder fashion and in their own context.

    Sadly, efforts to build these pillars continue to be negatively affected by the dark powers of corruption, both people and institutions with their vested interests resulting in unethical or even criminal behaviours that exist in both public and private sectors (including NGOs that are supposed to work with and for civil society) in all societies and political systems. This is why collective and concerted action is needed. Single persons and organisations cannot make change happen on their own, and there is a risk to fighting corruption. This make the promotion of integrity at scale often more complex and challenging. Building coalitions in different configurations are part of the solution, and sometimes promoting human rights, principles of water governance, and peer learning can be good ways to address the issue professionally and in a “neutral” way.

    I wish everybody all the best and also pleasure in addressing the various challenges at hand.

    Teun Bastemeijer
    Chief Advisor Strategy and Programmes
    Water Integrity Network eV

  • #20341
    Profile picture of
    mayhps
    Participant

    If you came across an integrity issue in your own context, what would be your approach to deal with it?
    As I have been working at the environment of promoting water integrity sector, we are directing toward the policy reforming and holding stakeholder consultation to prepare for the law. We request their vision and comments. Also we unite with all the sectors and we build the initiative of young water professional. In which capacity building, we invited one people from every ministries and outside which is related with water sectors and interested in water sector. And then we are creating the analysis scenarios in order to promote the future water sector development and future actions to be prepared. In this way, We are directing to the integrity and the success will be expected to become in the next 5 years.

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.